THE OFFICIAL WORLD-WIDE WEB SITE OF:
PROCLAIMING
JESUS CHRIST

THROUGH
CYBER-EVANGELIZATION
Today's Date:
Home
Contact Us
About Us
Family Ministries
Social Ministries
Pro-Life
Official Documents
Announcements
Documents on the CFC Crisis
Downloads on the CFC Crisis
Recognition by the Clergy
Support from the Community
Audio Tracks Downloads
News
Sharings & Testimonies
Schedule of Events
Treasury of Prayers
Photo Gallery
Links
Site Map
 
OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS
CFC-FFL
Roles of District Pastoral Leadership

CFC-FFL has a pyramidal pastoral structure. Aside from being able to care for a large number of members without overly burdening leaders, this structure provides for particular functions at different levels. In other words, the structure is not just for the purpose of dividing the large membership into more manageable cell groups, but more importantly it is attuned to the needs of members as they grow in Christ and to the needs of the larger community for the furtherance of its mission.1

Following is a basic description of the pastoral roles of servant leaders at each of the levels.

Household Servant
He is an older brother to the brethren under him. He has been with the community for at least a year, being in a household during that time. He has grown spiritually. He has some facilitation skills. He is willing to serve.

He is not expected to answer all questions or resolve all problems. He can give advice or inputs based on his own experience. Anything beyond him he passes on to the Unit Servant.

Unit Servant
He is the “father” to the unit, that is, his own unit household and all the households under his Household Servants. He has been a Household Servant for at least one year. He has grown further spiritually. He has greater maturity.

He is a low-level formator. He teaches. He concerns himself with the spiritual growth of unit members. He oversees (but not directs) the life of his Household Servants and through them, the lives of the other unit members. He deliberately looks to their growth in spirituality and in faithfulness to our covenant.

Chapter Servant
He is the “grandfather” of the chapter. He has been a Unit Servant for at least a year. His spiritual life is in fairly good order. He has grown in wisdom and commitment.

He is the overall formator of the chapter members,2 though he does this basically through his Unit Servants and his intervention is more on an as-needed basis. He concerns himself more with the overall life and service of the chapter. He is an administrator as well as a pastor. He coordinates, directs and oversees chapter activities, including services. He looks to the overall well-being of chapter members as well as the chapter as a whole, and intervenes directly with individuals whenever necessary. He guides the chapter’s parish involvement.

Cluster Servant
He is a senior. His basic role is to help provide pastoral care to Chapter Servants through the cluster household that he leads.3 In addition, he concerns himself with the pastoral development of the chapters in his cluster by giving inputs to Chapter Servants as needed. However, he does not lead nor take over the chapters.4 He looks to the cluster’s involvement in the vicariate (deanery).

District Servant
He is the overall pastor and governor of the district. He is the extension of the Servant General for the pastoral care of community members and the furtherance of our mission. His work is overseen through seniors with delegated authority from the Servant General.

He is responsible for the overall formation of the district members, though he does this basically through his Chapter Servants and his intervention is more on an as-needed basis. He concerns himself more with the overall life and service of the district. He is an administrator as well as a pastor. He coordinates, directs and oversees district activities, including services. He looks to the overall well-being of district members as well as the district as a whole, and intervenes directly with individuals whenever necessary. He guides the district’s involvement in the diocese.

Pastoral notes
The above are general guidelines that define and distinguish some of the basic functions of servant leaders at the different pastoral levels. It is not a comprehensive listing of how they pastor and serve the brethren. Other important aspects as evangelization, faithfulness to covenant and core values and culture, financial monitoring, Church relationship, etc., have not been touched on.

Though all servant leaders are important, the basic importance of particular leaders is stressed, as follows:

  • Household Servants – they care for new people, and are the ones who provide the initial experience of the love of Christ and the face of community.5 Their role is thus crucial, being the front-liners in our evangelization.
  • Unit Servants – they are the basic formators. Unlike Household Servants who are basically facilitators providing “milk to babies in Christ,” they help provide the “solid food” that enables community members to grow strongly in their life in Christ. Their role is crucial, as they provide the back-up for the front-liners.
  • Chapter Servants – they head the “mini CFC-FFL” which is the basic localized community, capable of living out the fullness of our life and mission.

Some of the functions described have to be adapted to particular situations. For example:

  • One-year requirements mentioned for Household, Unit and Chapter Servants may have to be relaxed in certain situations. For example, when we open in a new area and leaders are appointed from among CLS participants.

Appropriate training is given at each level of servant leadership.

For couples and for single sisters and handmaids, the appropriate adaptation in terminology (“he” to “they” or to “she”) is to be applied.


(SG. May 1, 2009)


1 The servant leaders in the different levels do not just have the same basic function but in ever larger groupings as you go up the pyramid. Rather, the particular function of each level of leadership is really quite specialized and different from the others.
2 Formation is not handled by the PFO, which office prepares programs and teachings, but implementation belongs to the territorial leadership.
3 Since the Chapter Servants in his household are already seniors, the burden for formation should be lighter. Thus the Cluster Servant may have added time and energy for doing major services in the community. Thus while his being a Cluster Servant is considered a major service, he could very well still take on another major service.
4 As such, he does not have to have a formal service meeting with his Chapter Servants, unless absolutely necessary for some reason.
5 Together with the facilitators and team in a CLS.

Copyright 2008 Couples for Christ Foundation, Inc.
Apartelle 12, Star Mall, Edsa corner Shaw Blvd.
Mandaluyong City 1550, Philippines
Tel. Nos. +63(2) 718-2213 * Fax No. +63(2) 718-2213
E-Mail: homeoffice@cfcffl.org
CFC-FFL Webmaster E-Mail:webmaster@cfcffl.org